Mesothelioma Patients and the Possible Ways of Prolonging their Lives

Posted by on Aug 4, 2015 in Injuries | 0 comments

On Christmas day of 2009, George, a former US military man, who first served in the Air Force and then worked in Charleston’s Navy Shipyards, was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare, yet deadly type of cancer. Having received the news on what should have been a festive occasion was tragic enough as no one in the family (not even this military personnel, himself) thought that his constant exposure to asbestos during his active duty would result to the development of this irreversible and incurable cancer after many decades.

The worst events, however, were still to come.

On March 16, 2011, exactly 16 months after George was diagnosed with mesothelioma, he finally gave up his fight against the deadly cancer. While still grieving over his loss, though, it was his wife’s turn to be diagnosed with the same type of cancer. Pauline (his wife) discovered in August of 2011 that she too had mesothelioma; the cancer gave her only until November of that same year.

It is sad to note that the only way Pauline got exposed to asbestos was by washing George’s clothes after he got home from work. Obviously, asbestos’ sharp, microscopic fibers attached themselves onto his clothes (and probably hair and other parts of the body), a possibility that may have exposed their three children to the toxic mineral as well.

Mesothelioma is an aggressive type of cancer. Despite its very long latency period, about 20 – 40 years before showing symptoms, it can very quickly spread to other parts of the body. Upon discovery of its symptoms, this cancer would already have developed into an advanced stage (usually stage 3 or 4), rendering it already irreversible and incurable; patients’ survival rate after diagnosis is usually only up to two years.

Continuous research by mesothelioma specialists, however, has allowed them to discover some ways that would delay spreading of the cancer and extend patients’ survival rates. Forms of treatment include: combination of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) or “heated chemotherapy,” and cytoreductive surgery; herbal and homeopathic medicine; surgical resection or segmentectomy; use of immunotherapy drug; consumption of antioxidants, such as melatonin which is found in red tart cherries; or, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy or mesothelioma radiation.

While some patients have lived three or five years longer, a certain few have continuously beaten the illness for more than 10 years. Surviving longer, though, is affected by the patient’s overall health, age, gender, stage of the cancer, the location or the organ affected, the type of mesothelioma that has developed (epithelial, sarcomatoid or the mixed type of the illness), and the stage of the cancer when treatment began.

Not all patients are strong enough to undergo treatment though, and while some risk surgery, saying they have nothing to lose since they’ll die anyway, never make it too. Those who are able to survive, on the other hand, due to chemotherapy, intake of drug or herbal medicine, etc., rely on these treatments continuously, depleting them of their financial resources after some time.

The website of the Williams Kherkher Law Firm explains the importance of consulting with a medical professional as soon as possible once the symptoms of mesothelioma are felt or if the person knows that his or her work exposed him or her to asbestos.

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A Little More Light on Tardive Dyskinesia and Risperdal

Posted by on Apr 15, 2015 in Injuries, Lawyers | 0 comments

Involuntary movement is the best way to describe what is tardive dyskinesia. It is frequently if somewhat carelessly included in the list of possible side effects of some drugs, typically in neuroleptic (also known as antipsychotic) drugs. However, it is important to understand that these involuntary movements can have serious effects. The most common symptoms manifestations of tardive dyskinesia are:

  • Excessive eye blinking
  • Grimacing
  • Lip puckering
  • Lip smacking
  • Lip pursing
  • Tongue movements

One can imagine how disconcerting it is to be in conversation with a person with tardive dyskinesia, even when you understand what it is. There are also instances when the rapid, involuntary muscle spasms can make it impossible for a patient to walk.

It would be accurate to say that tardive dyskinesia is a common side effect of typical antipsychotics, and that the condition is both devastating and incurable. It would also be accurate to say that atypical antipsychotics such as Risperdal have improved on this by delaying its onset. However, Risperdal side effects lawyers know that it still causes tardive dyskinesia in patients with high doses over a long period, which is contrary to what the drug manufacturer initially claimed.

Recent lawsuits based on disputing this claim have come down on the side of the plaintiffs, and it is now widely known that tardive dyskinesia is a possible side effect. However, there is no significant emphasis on how bad it can get for the patient, or on what it means. As far as the regular patient is concerned, it is “involuntary movement.” What most people do not realize is that tardive dyskinesia is a symptom of advanced neurological damage. Once it becomes noticeable, it means there is no reversing the damage.

If you or an immediate family member manifests tardive dyskinesia from using Risperdal, you are too late to prevent permanent damage. However, you may still be able to get compensation. Consult with experienced Risperdal side effects lawyers in your area to find out more about your legal options.

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Levels of Traumatic Brain Injuries

Posted by on Apr 12, 2014 in Injuries | 0 comments

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are all caused by physical violence, whether accidental or intentional, and all are serious. The brain is a delicate structure with a lot on its plate when it comes to human function, so even relatively minor trauma can have significant effect on the injured individual. However, there are levels of severity that have a direct impact on the prognosis of the patient.

Mild

As the term suggests, mild TBI is the least severe, and registers between 13 and 15 in the Glasgow Coma Scale.
Mild traumatic brain injury occurs when:

  • Loss of consciousness is very brief, usually a few seconds or minutes
  • Loss of consciousness does not have to occur—the person may be dazed or confused
  • Testing or scans of the brain may appear normal
  • A mild traumatic brain injury is diagnosed only when there is a change in the mental status at the time of injury—the person is dazed, confused, or loses consciousness. The change in mental status indicates that the person’s brain functioning has been altered, this is called a concussion

Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury (Glascow Coma Scale core 9-12)

Most brain injuries result from moderate and minor head injuries. Such injuries usually result from a non-penetrating blow to the head, and/or a violent shaking of the head. As luck would have it many individuals sustain such head injuries without any apparent consequences. However, for many others, such injuries result in lifelong disabling impairments.

A moderate traumatic brain injury occurs when:

  • A loss of consciousness lasts from a few minutes to a few hours
  • Confusion lasts from days to weeks
  • Physical, cognitive, and/or behavioral impairments last for months or are permanent.

Persons with moderate traumatic brain injury generally can make a good recovery with treatment or successfully learn to compensate for their deficits.

Severe Brain Injury

Severe head injuries usually result from crushing blows or penetrating wounds to the head. Such injuries crush, rip and shear delicate brain tissue. This is the most life threatening, and the most intractable type of brain injury.

Typically, heroic measures are required in treatment of such injuries. Frequently, severe head trauma results in an open head injury, one in which the skull has been crushed or seriously fractured. Treatment of open head injuries usually requires prolonged hospitalization and extensive rehabilitation. Typically, rehabilitation is incomplete and for most part there is no return to pre-injury status. Closed head injuries can also result in severe brain injury.
TBI can cause a wide range of functional short- or long-term changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions.

TBI can also cause epilepsy and increase the risk for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other brain disorders that become more prevalent with age.

Repeated mild TBIs occurring over an extended period of time (i.e., months, years) can result in cumulative neurological and cognitive deficits. Repeated mild TBIs occurring within a short period of time (i.e., hours, days, or weeks) can be catastrophic or fatal.

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Birth Injuries and Disability

Posted by on Mar 18, 2014 in Injuries | 0 comments


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWrm9lZTvNs

There are probably few things more tragic than an otherwise healthy baby being subjected to birth injuries that have long-term consequences. Aside from the fact of the immediate pain and suffering of the child, the emotional (not to mention financial) impact on the parents are often considerable.

According to the website of Goings Law Firm, LLC in South Carolina, birth injuries occur more often than most people believe even in these days of modern medicine. On average, it is believed that as many as three birth injuries occur each hour in the US alone. This is not so strange if one thinks about it. After all, childbirth remains one of the most traumatic experiences of humans, and it does not take much for something untoward to happen. It could be due to poor prenatal care, prolonged labor, breech birth, cephalopelvic disproportion, or medical negligence. One birth injury which occurs in as many as 2 out of every 1,000 live births is Erb’s Palsy, also known as Brachial Plexus Nerve Palsy.

Erb’s palsy is not automatically a serious birth injury. When the birth is difficult because the baby is too large or in a breech delivery, injury may occur when there is pressure on the brachial plexus, a network of nerves located in the neck area, from excessive pulling during birth.

Erb’s palsy is essentially a type of paralysis; movement is restricted because the brachial plexus is damaged. The brachial plexus mainly controls voluntary movements in the arm and hands. However, in most cases Erb’s palsy is a temporary condition, and the baby may regain movement in the affected limb within three months.

In cases where the damage to the brachial plexus is severe, such as when some portion is avulsed or completely torn, then partial or total disability of that limb for voluntary movement becomes permanent. Because the injury occurs at birth, the development of the affected limb is arrested, so the affliction is physically apparent. In these cases, the weakened limb is something the victim of the birth injury will have to live with their entire life.

Birth injuries are certainly unfortunate incidents, but when it is due to medical negligence, it becomes nearly criminal. It is the right of the parents to seek compensation for their child from the responsible parties, not only for the physical pain and suffering and medical expenses, but also for the emotional and psychological impact. Consult with a birth injury lawyer in your area get started on getting justice for your child.

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